St. Louis Public Radio

Top Stories

U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay, right, and candidate Bill Haas, center, speak as state Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal answers a question.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Senate removes Chappelle-Nadal from committees; expulsion still looms

Missouri’s Senate leadership made the rare move of stripping Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal of her committee assignments on Tuesday. It’s because of a Facebook comment she posted and later deleted last week that hoped for President Donald Trump’s assassination. She has resisted numerous calls from Republicans and Democrats, including Gov. Eric Greitens and U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, to step down.

Read More
U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill makes a point during a town hall meeting on August 23, 2017, in Bowling Green.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

BOWLING GREEN -- U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill’s August recess town hall tour made a stop in northeast Missouri on Wednesday, a historically Democratic stronghold that went heavily for Republican President Donald Trump.

It’s part of rural tour of sorts that McCaskill said is vital for Democrats like her to undertake — especially as she gears up for a potentially tough re-election battle next year.

Crevonda Nance, Herring's sister-in-law, is supported by community activists – including Gina Torres, to the left of her, whose son was killed by police in June. Nance drove to St. Louis from Mississippi after finding out Herring was killed by police.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 5:24 p.m. — Members of the LGBTQ community, activists and advocates are outraged that police shot and killed a transgender black woman this week.

Frustrated by the shooting — and that police identified Kenneth “Kiwi” Herring as a man — about 40 people gathered outside the building in which Herring was shot Tuesday for a vigil and to express dissatisfaction with a police force they said was disrespectful and too quick to shoot.

East St. Louis teachers walk out of their union hall after voting to approve a tentative contract agreement and end a month-long teacher strike Friday Oct. 30, 2015.
File photo | Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Illinois’ teacher pension system creates an unequal funding structure between rich and poor public school districts, a report released Wednesday said.

That’s because the state pays the majority of teachers’ pensions, which are tied to a teacher’s salary. The more the teacher earns, the more the state’s share of his or her pension. According to the nonpartisan Bellwether Education Partners report, when pay and benefits are factored in, the gap between per-student funding in rich and poor schools widens.

Our monthly legal roundtable returns to discuss pressing issues of the law with Bill Freivogel, Rachel Sachs and Mark Smith.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, our monthly Legal Roundtable convened to discuss pressing issues of the law.

WOW air, which will start flights in St. Louis next year, was launched in 2011by Icelandic entrepreneur Skúli Mogensen.
BriYYZ | Flickr

The St. Louis region is about to get a direct link to Reykjavik. Iceland-based WOW air will begin four flights a week between St. Louis Lambert International Airport and Keflavik International Airport in May. From there, passengers can go on to European cities including Berlin, Paris, and London.

Good Life Growing operates 20 "hoop houses," which are a kind of greenhouse.
File photo | Provided | James Forbes

An urban farming nonprofit is the winner of a competition for a free restaurant space in St. Louis’ Old North area.

James Forbes and his partners at Good Life Growing will open Old North Provisions, a restaurant, grocery store and co-op at 2720 N. 14th St.

They’ll offer their own and other local produce on store shelves, a buffet line and take-out packages. Forbes said his operation will provide an alternative to neighboring Crown Candy Kitchen, known for its ice cream and hearty sandwiches.

This treehopper in a greenhouse at Saint Louis University would not normally have a purple horn or "pronotum." It was painted that color for identification purposes.
File photo | Véronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

Researchers are studying countless plants and animals to understand how climate change could threaten populations. At Saint Louis University, scientists want to know if changes in temperature could affect the mating songs of insects.  

Biologists at SLU have received $480,000 from the National Science Foundation to study how temperature affects treehopper mating songs, which could provide clues as to how climate change could affect insect survival. The loss of insect species could adversely affect agriculture and many ecosystems that depend on them.

Union members gathered at the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Hall on Aug. 8, 2017, to notarize and turn in petitions to force a statewide vote over Missouri’s right-to-work law.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri labor unions were successful in getting enough signatures to all but guarantee the state’s new right-to-work law won’t go into effect a week from now as Gov. Eric Greitens had planned.

But the real battle is just getting started. Come November 2018, voters around the state will determine whether to kill or keep the law, which bars unions and employers from requiring all workers in a bargaining unit to pay dues. But only 10 percent of Missouri workers are in a union.

Mazy Gilleylen bounces on a trampoline outside her home in Overland. Summer 2017.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Mazy Gilleylen of Overland is looking forward to her 12th birthday in September. But she’s dreading what comes next.

Approaching puberty is alarming for transgender kids like Mazy. To them, the changes can feel like like a betrayal of who they really are. Doctors can prescribe puberty-blocking drugs to prevent unwanted prevent breast growth or a deepening voice. But the cost is out of reach for many families.

Two eclipse chasers at Steampunk Brew Works in Town and Country retrofitted steampunk-style glasses wtih welder's lenses to view the eclipse.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Did you hear? A major celestial event crossed the Missouri and Illinois skies on Monday, Aug. 21. St. Louis on the Air had you covered with a two-hour special during the eclipse.

From 12 – 2 p.m. on Monday, St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh brought you a two-hour special program about the total solar eclipse, discussing the cultural, scientific, economic, and celestial phenomena.

Pages

St. Louis on the Air

Thursday: Confederate monument controversy, in the classroom

A New City School teacher is using the controversy over Confederate monuments, including the recently-removed Confederate Memorial in Forest Park, to teach students about diversity and inclusion.

Don't know what to do with that old car?

Turn it into your favorite programs!

An in-depth look at publicly funded, independent schools in Missouri

Public Insight Network

Help inform our coverage

Become part of our Public Insight Network. We use the PIN to get insight from people like you. Today's question: Should Missouri Senate remove Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal?